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Thursday - June 13, 2013

From: Oklahoma City, OK
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Hardy taproot trees for Oklahoma City
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What are some hardy tap root trees for central Oklahoma?

ANSWER:

Here is a previous Mr. Smarty Plants question on trees with taproots. Here is the list of taprooted trees in that answer that are native to Oklahoma.

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash)  has a rapid growth rate and is long-lived, 30 to 45 feet.  It  also has beautiful fall foliage.  Here is  more information.

Juglans microcarpa (little walnut) has a moderate growth rate of 20 to 50 feet.  Here is  more information.

Quercus buckleyi (Buckley oak) has moderate growth of 15 to 50 feet and colorful fall foliage.  Here is more information.

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) has a rapid growth rate of 15 to 30 feet.  Here is more information.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas ash
Fraxinus albicans

Little walnut
Juglans microcarpa

Texas red oak
Quercus buckleyi

Eastern redbud
Cercis canadensis

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