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Monday - September 10, 2012

From: Washington, DC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives, Transplants, Trees
Title: Problems with new transplant non-native weeping willow from Washington DC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I replanted a very young BABY weeping willow tree and now it looks as if the leaves are drying up like it is dying. I know that it could also be in shock from the new transplant or it can be dying My question is should I cut off the dying leaves and dying branches and wait for new ones to grow?

ANSWER:

This is not a new subject for us. Please read this previous question on transplanting a young willow. This previous question covers most of your question. We would recommend neither planting nor pruning a woody plant, native or not, until November, and see how it is doing then.

 

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