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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - July 28, 2011

From: Westlock, AB
Region: Canada
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Survival of non-native rosemary on sea breeze from Alberta Canada
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I read that Rosemary, in some locations, can live on nothing other than the humidity carried by the sea breeze. Is this true?

ANSWER:

Since Alberta has no seacoast, it's likely this is just a matter of curiosity. However, Rosemarinus officinalis, rosemary, is a Mediterranean herb which has been spread to many parts of the world. It is not native to North America, and therefore not in our Native Plant Database. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which those plants grow natively. From About.com this article You Can Grow Rosemary includes the information that the Latin name means "dew of the sea," which is no doubt where the belief you asked about originated.

 

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