En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - January 27, 2005

From: The Netherlands, Other
Region: Other
Topic: Non-Natives, Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Smarty Plants on Kokias
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am searching for seeds of different Kokias (Kokia cookei, K. drynariodes and K. kauaiensis) and Thespesias (Thespesia grandiflora, T. thespesioides, T. nerifolia and T. populnea). Perhaps there are other Kokias and Thespesias. Can you help me, please? Perhaps you know other people or botanical gardens who can help me. I am living in Holland and have a greenhouse.

ANSWER:

One of the species of Thespesia (T. grandiflora, common name "maga") is native to Hawaii and one (T. populnea, Portia tree) grows in Florida and Hawaii, but is not native. Its origin is India. T. thespesiodes or T. nerifolia are not native to the U. S. The three Kokias, treecottons, (Kokia cookei, K. drynariodes and K. kauaiensis) as well as K. lanceolata are all natives of Hawaii. K. drynariodes is considered endangered in Hawaii and K. cookei is even rarer so it may be difficult to find seeds of these. K. kauaiensis is also listed as endangered but in somewhat better shape than the other two. K. lanceolata became extinct in the late 1800s or 1900s.

Since all these species are native or grow in Hawaii, you might have success in locating seeds by contacting arboreta such as Lyon Arboretum at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and botanical gardens in Hawaii.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Deadheading a petunia and why
July 13, 2008 - Can you please tell me the correct way to de-head a petunia and why?
view the full question and answer

Pollination of non-native cucumber plants in Austin
July 15, 2010 - I have 3 cucumber plants that are in planter boxes hanging from my wrought iron fence and they use it as a trellis. All 3 plants are producing only female flowers. No male. None of them have produc...
view the full question and answer

Sap oozing from non-native Chinese pistache in San Antonio
September 07, 2011 - I live in San Antonio, and my chinese pistache is exuding copious amounts of a sticky sap from old trim sites and from the trunk itself. The tree is about 12 years old and has been healthy up until no...
view the full question and answer

Winterizing non-native sedum in Saskatchewan CA
October 31, 2011 - What should be done to winterize a autumn joy (sedum)?
view the full question and answer

Plants purchased at Duke Gardens From Durham NC
April 09, 2013 - I went to the plant sale at a local garden this week and bought some very small plants. I am happy to wait for plants to grow but wondered if I need to do anything special. I live in Durham NC and...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center