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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Thursday - June 01, 2006

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shrubs, Trees
Title: Hill Country natives for a hedge
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Can you recommend a "hedge type" bush to use in lieu of a fence along the road in the San Antonio region? My whole back yard is planted with Hill Country natives and I would prefer to keep the theme! This area would get full sun unlike the rest of the yard. Help! My husband is looking at Home Depot!

ANSWER:

Well, we have a bunch of plants to recommend to keep your husband from buying something nonnative! We have 5 good condidates for you, all evergreen. all are deer resistant and all but the Cenizo and the Texas Mountain Laurel produce berries that are used by wildlife.

Agarita (Mahonia trifoliolata)
Cenizo or Purple sage (Leucophyllum frutescens)
Evergreen sumac (Rhus virens)
Texas mountain laurel ( Sophora secundiflora)
Yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria)

You can find nurseries that specialize in native plants for your area by searching in our National Suppliers Directory.

 

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