En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
8 ratings

Monday - May 16, 2011

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Visual difference between Yarrow and Queen Anne's lace in Austin, TX?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

What is different, visually, between yarrow and Queen Anne's lace?

ANSWER:

Yarrow, Achillea millefolium (Common yarrow) and Queen Anne's Lace bear a great resemblance, but botanically they are quite different. They are in different families and their flowering structures are different.

Yarrow is in the Aster family (Asteraceae) and bears variously colored flowers in clusters at the tips of its shoots. Queen Anne's Lace is in the Carrot family (Apiaceae) and bears its white flowers in heads termed umbels at the tips of shoots

Another difference that is easy to see is in the leaves. By comparing the illustrations for Yarrow and Queen Anne’s Lace, you will see that they both have compound leaves, but the attachment of the leaves is different   (scroll down to "leaf arrangement"). Leaves of Queen Anne’s Lace have an opposite arrangement while the leaves of  Yarrow have an alternate arrangement. The leaves of Yarrow are also more finely divided. In fact, the species name millefolium literally means “ a thousand leaves”. Its kind of like a millipede, but different.

 



 

More Plant Identification Questions

E-mailing a picture for Plant ID from Dexter KY
June 25, 2012 - Could I email a picture of a vine that is taking over my porch? Can't seem to find it anywhere. It is dark green and relatively shiny with 10 leaves on each stem.
view the full question and answer

Identification of fast-growing weeds with orange flowers
July 14, 2013 - I have fast growing plants (weeds?) in my heavily wooded backyard. They reach heights of over 6 ft and have orange flowers. I have spent hours searching the web today with no success -the closest thin...
view the full question and answer

Plant identfication
August 16, 2009 - We live in a forested area in Rockmart,GA. There is a creek in the woods and a lily type plant that only flowers occasionally. It is white in the center and has thin white spires that jut out from t...
view the full question and answer

Plant identification
March 15, 2011 - I don't know where this plant is from! I hope you can still help! I was given a plant,about 8in tall,stem and limbs are yellow it doesn't grow leaves it just has thorns do you have any idea what it ...
view the full question and answer

Identification of plant on shores of Lake Erie
September 27, 2011 - I've used Newcomb's and several other guides but cannot ID: Green small dot like flowers, found on the beach of Lake Erie in Dunkirk NY, many of them growing right in the sand. Smells very much, a...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center