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Sunday - October 17, 2010

From: Willis, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Groundcovers
Title: Groundcover for area under oaks in Lake Conroe, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live just off Lake Conroe, and my backyard is more dirt than grass. It is under a number of oak trees, and the dirt is more of a silt than a sand. I need suggestions for a quick growing ground cover, that will handle being walked on.

ANSWER:

Here are several suggestions for groundcovers for Montgomery County:

Calyptocarpus vialis (Straggler daisy) would be a good choice.  It will tolerate moderate foot traffic, will probably stay evergreen through the winter in Montgomery County, and it grows in shade, part shade and sun.

Phyla nodiflora (Texas frogfruit) is another groundcover that grows in shade, part shade and sun, tolerates moderate foot traffic.  Depending on winter temperatures, it will stay evergreen or become dormant.

Mitchella repens (Partridgeberry) would probably work well in areas that gets no foot traffic.  You might be able to use it with the straggler daisy and/or the Texas frogfruit.

A sedge lawn is also a possibility.  One of the sedges,  Carex texensis (Texas sedge), mentioned in the article Sedge Lawns for Every Landscape, would work for your area.  It is evergreen and grows in sun and part shade.  It should withstand moderate foot traffic.


Calyptocarpus vialis


Calyptocarpus vialis


Phyla nodiflora


Phyla nodiflora


Mitchella repens


Mitchella repens


Carex texensis

 

 

 

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