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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Sunday - May 16, 2010

From: Cat Spring, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Can non-native star jasmine attract snakes?
Answered by: Nan Hampton


I have star jasmine climbing up my house. Can it attract snakes?


Trachelospermum jasminoides (star or Confederate jasmine), native to China, is no more attractive to snakes than any other plant.  The main reason for any plant being attractive to snakes is because the plant attracts rodents, birds, lizards or other potential snake food.  Snakes also might use plants as a place to optimize their personal environmental space—for sun to warm them or for shade to cool them.  Although snakes can climb trees and walls that are rough enough for their scales to get a good purchase, most snakes spend the majority of their time on the ground hidden under rocks, plants or in holes.


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