En EspaÑol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - March 29, 2011

From: Georgetown, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native ornamental peach purchased in Georgetown TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I purchased an "ornamental peach" at a plant sale in Georgetown, TX. Only info it had on the tag: 6' tall. The leaves are long and narrow, burgundy, with serrated edges; is in a 1-qt pot. Any care/info on this? Will it survive here?

ANSWER:

This is not the only request on purchasing unnamed plants we have received. We are advising people to refuse to purchase plants that do not have a name attached. If it's a common name, that's okay, you can usually find it on the Internet, but the scientific name is even better, because while a plant may have several common names or the same common name may be used for different plants, there is only one correct scientific name.

Now, as to the "ornamental peach," the first thing we can tell you is that it is not a native tree. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which those plants natively grow.

So, following our own advice, we went to the Internet and discovered that "ornamental peach" is usually a common name for Prunus persica, which has been so hybridized that it does not grow anywhere in the wild, and probably originated in China. An Arizona Wildflowers website on Prunus persica refers to it as a "dwarf peach" and has quite a bit of information on its care. This Dave's Garden Forum website will give you some more information and comments on the tree. It would appear that it can survive in Georgetown, Texas.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Bloom color change in Choctaw Crape Myrtle
July 30, 2007 - In 2006 my wife bought a Choctaw Crape Myrtle from a local nursery. It had a tag from Greenleaf Nursery and had several blooms in the "correct" pink color. The plant was 5-6 ft tall. It has grown...
view the full question and answer

Non-native creeping fig
February 26, 2009 - I like the creeping fig that covers my brick wall but the roots are very invasive and are choking my rose bushes and other surrounding plants. I spent two days removing the roots and loosening the so...
view the full question and answer

Leaves of non-native crape myrtle browning in Sinton TX
June 12, 2010 - Crepe myrtle – tips of leaves are brown and curling up.
view the full question and answer

Information about non-native Canaga odorata, ylang-ylang
July 10, 2008 - can you tell me the composition of canaga odarata or ylang-ylang flower? also, beneficial effects? it's for my science project..
view the full question and answer

Moving non-native globe willow in Mansfield TX
August 10, 2009 - I have a globe willow that we planted in a little landscaped area out front of house not realizing how large top would get. Can I move the tree without damaging it? It is about 9 ft tall, 5-6 ft wid...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center