Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - November 25, 2005

From: Alpena, MI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Inadvisability of introducing American Beautyberry to Michigan
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I recently brought back to Michigan from Florida 2 young beauty berry plants. I currently have them in a pot inside my home. They are growing quite well, and show a hearty appearance. What are the chances that I can get them to grow outside next spring/summer? I really want to have this plant a part of my landscaping. It is so beautiful, and would be so easy to grow. I live in Alpena, Michigan. I appreciate your help in this.

ANSWER:

It is very unlikely that the American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) would survive the Michigan winters since its natural range is the southeastern United States. You can see the distribution map and read about some of the plant's characteristics and growth requirements in the USDA Plants Database. The USDA Hardiness Zone designation for this plant is Zones 6-10. The American beautyberry is a beautiful plant and it is certainly understandable that you would want to grow it in Michigan. However, even if it would survive in Michigan, we would not recommend that you introduce a plant that is not native to the region. Indeed, even if it were native to Michigan we would not recommend that you transplant a Florida plant with its unique genotypic component into the Michigan population.

 

More Shrubs Questions

Shrubs for area around underground storm shelter
May 27, 2013 - We want to plant shrubs around our underground storm shelter to divide it from our parking area. Obviously, this is to avoid having someone drive on top of the shelter. What native shrub to North GA ...
view the full question and answer

Search for non-native Rosa Rugosa for Granbury TX
November 12, 2012 - I would like to find an old fashioned Rosa Rugosa (non-hybrid) to grow in central Texas. I know I've seen them occasionally when traveling in the central TX area. I want them for their rose hips. ...
view the full question and answer

Non-native Lorapetalum chinense from Driftwood TX
March 16, 2012 - In a previous response you said that it would not be wise to plant any trees with the word Chinese in it. Does this apply to Lorapetalum (Chinese Fringe Flower)? I would like to use this plant as a ...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen Hedge for Austin
November 28, 2010 - Hello, We live in Austin and have a yard that is almost fully shaded. We have a few burford holly bushes there, but would like to add some evergreen interest. We would love a tall hedge (around 8 ft...
view the full question and answer

Non-native invasive Siebold viburnum from Isleboro ME
June 17, 2012 - I was given several small Siebold Viburnum for planting on my Maine property. Even though it is often for sale in nurseries, I'm aware it is listed as invasive in several eastern states. Shouldn't I...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.