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Thursday - October 27, 2005

From: Inverness, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Deer Resistant
Title: Safely killing Paedeeria cruddasiana Prain (sewer vine)
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Is there anyway to safely kill Paederia cruddasiana Prain (sewer vine)? Thank you!


The safest method to use to kill sewer vine (Paederia cruddasiana) is to take it out by hand by cutting it down and digging up its roots. Depending on how much you have, this could be a formidable task; and it will take vigilance to keep it at bay.

Chemical control is another option. The recommendation for chemical control of a similar species,Skunkvine (P. foetida), by the University of Florida, IFAS Extension is the use of herbicides containing trichlopyr compounds (trichlopyr amine or trichlopyr ester) or imazapic. The oral toxicity for humans is reported to be low for imazapic and moderate for the triclopyr compounds. And, although the ecological and environmental effects for both triclopyr and imazapic are minimal, they are not zero. Vegetation supporting the vine and nearby vegetation are especially at risk. IFAS Extension of the University of Florida has an excellent paper, "Control of Non-native Plants in Natural Areas of Florida", discussing various control methods for invasive plants in Florida.

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center does not take a stand on the use of chemical herbicides and pesticides other than to urge that the utmost of care and caution should be exercised by those who choose to use them.

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