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Wednesday - November 11, 2009

From: Rockport, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Where to plant the Texas Olive tree?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I need to know where to plant the Texas Olive Tree, and what kind of care is required, such as watering, pruning, fertilization.

ANSWER:

Texas olive tree Cordia boissieri (anacahuita) is native to south Texas and can be grown as a shrub or a small tree. Its showy white flowers make it an attractive addition to the home landscape. It is not a true olive tree, but because its fruits resemble olives, it is known as the Texas Olive. Planting it in Rockport, Texas should not be a problem.

The tree needs full sun and well drained soil to prosper. It can grow in various soil types; Sandy, Sandy Loam, Medium Loam, Clay Loam, Clay, with a pH around neutrality. It is a slow growing tree with moderate water use and is drought tolerant. Since it is a native, it shouldn't need fertilization. Because of its relatively small size, it can be planted fairly close to the house.

This article from the University of Florida IFAS Extension has some interesting information about Texas Olive.

This Trees are Good website has a wealth of information about all aspects of tree care from planting to pruning and in between.


Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

 

 

 

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