En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Wednesday - November 11, 2009

From: Rockport, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Where to plant the Texas Olive tree?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I need to know where to plant the Texas Olive Tree, and what kind of care is required, such as watering, pruning, fertilization.

ANSWER:

Texas olive tree Cordia boissieri (anacahuita) is native to south Texas and can be grown as a shrub or a small tree. Its showy white flowers make it an attractive addition to the home landscape. It is not a true olive tree, but because its fruits resemble olives, it is known as the Texas Olive. Planting it in Rockport, Texas should not be a problem.

The tree needs full sun and well drained soil to prosper. It can grow in various soil types; Sandy, Sandy Loam, Medium Loam, Clay Loam, Clay, with a pH around neutrality. It is a slow growing tree with moderate water use and is drought tolerant. Since it is a native, it shouldn't need fertilization. Because of its relatively small size, it can be planted fairly close to the house.

This article from the University of Florida IFAS Extension has some interesting information about Texas Olive.

This Trees are Good website has a wealth of information about all aspects of tree care from planting to pruning and in between.


Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Looking for Manzanita (Mt. Diablo variety)
April 19, 2009 - Hi, We live in the Alhambra Valley area; in the country between Martinez and Lafayette/Orina. Can you tell me where I can purchase Manzanita, preferably Mt. Diablo variety if possible? I've aske...
view the full question and answer

More on preventing suckers on live oaks in Austin
August 01, 2010 - I just received an oak sprout answer id=6021. I have a followup question. Our sprouts are caused by the motte we live in - 12 live oaks on 1/4 acre. I understand we will have to hand dig 1000s of t...
view the full question and answer

Concerns about swings on trees in Arboretum from San Marcos
June 01, 2012 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, We very much enjoyed our visit to the new Arboretum this morning! It is already lovely with native species but will really be something with the additions the Wildflower Cent...
view the full question and answer

Problems with sophora secundiflora
April 19, 2008 - My mountain laurel is looking bad. It has lost of its leaves, especially on the lower part of the tree (it's about 7 feet tall) and many of the remaining ones don't look good - they are curled up an...
view the full question and answer

Failure to thrive of potted blue-green cypress
July 26, 2008 - I received a small 14" potted blue-green cypress for Christmas 2007. Kept it in a bright window, not direct sun. It was doing great until two weeks ago when it started turning brown from the center. ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center