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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Friday - September 30, 2005

From: Rubicon, WI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Edible Plants
Title: Edible wild plants in Montana
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Where can I find information about wild edible plants in Montana?

ANSWER:

There is an excellent source on the Montana Plant Life webpage. The edible plants are divided into the following categories: Berries, Seeds, Leaves, Stems, Flowers, Roots, and Spices. There is a description of the plant with photographs and the plant's distribution. There is a description of the edible portions (with cautionary notes) and how the plants have been used tradtionally.

Here are some print sources for information about edible plants in general and edible plants in the West:

1. Gregory L. Tilford. 1997. Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West. Mountain Press Publishing.
2. Thomas Elias and Peter Dykeman. 1990. Edible Wild Plants. Sterling Publishing.
3. Betty Derig and Margaret Fuller. 2001. Wild Berries of the West. Mountain Press Publishing.

You can read reviews of these and several more titles on the Wild Food Adventures web page.

Here is another list for the wetter areas of the Pacific Northwest.

1. Terry Domico. 1982. Wild Harvest: Edible Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Hancock House Publishing.
2. Carol R. Biggs. Wild Edible & Medicinal Plants: Alaska, Canada & Pacific Northwest Rainforest. Alaska Nature Connection.

You can also find more books in the Native Plant Bibliography on the Wildflower Center web page.
 

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