Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - September 14, 2005

From: Elkhart, IN
Region: Midwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Texas Sage in Indiana
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I was living in Texas and now I have moved to Indiana. I would love to have some Texas Sage here. is it possible?

ANSWER:

One of the problems with common names is that many are shared by more than one species of plant. I am going to surmise that the Texas Sage you're referring to is Leucophyllum frutescens, also known as Cenizo, Purple Sage, Texas Silverleaf and Texas Rangers. Leucophyllum frutescens is native to South Texas and will not survive the rainier, colder winters of Indiana.

Another Texas Sage, Salvia texana, is also a South Texas native and would suffer the same fate in Indiana as Leucophyllum frutescens.

Since you can't live in Texas for now, we would suggest that you look into native Indiana plant species for your garden there. You can find lots of information on Indiana plant species on the Native Plant Information Network. There, you can search our Native Plants Database by state and get a list and information on plants that are more adapted to your area.

 

More Shrubs Questions

Evergreen shrubs native to North Georgia
March 26, 2007 - I am looking for native plants (shrubs) that will stay green during the winter in North Georgia. We are completing a xeriscape landscape plan as a demonstration site and have many native plants donate...
view the full question and answer

Replacing non-native boxwood in Austin
October 03, 2011 - I have a large maze garden, possibly boxwood, originally planted in the 1950's, in Austin, Texas. About 1/3 of it has died out, probably due to drought, heat and age. Should I attempt to replant ju...
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native photinia in Austin
October 07, 2013 - Hi, I live in Cedar Park, TX (Austin Suburb)and have planted a number of Photinia shrubs in various areas of my property. All about 10 months old. The leaves are curling along their length on many...
view the full question and answer

Pruning a mock orange in Charleston WV
March 30, 2009 - How far back and when do I prune a "Mock Orange" in order to get it to bloom?
view the full question and answer

Plants for a sandy slope at a weekend cabin in central WI.
June 30, 2009 - I have a cabin in central Wisconsin where the soil is equivalent to a sandy beach. There are some areas that are nearly impossible to mow because of how steep the incline is. Could you recommend som...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.