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Mr. Smarty Plants - Problems with non-native weeping willow in Villanova PA

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Friday - July 03, 2009

From: Villanova, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problems with non-native weeping willow in Villanova PA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My weeping willow (6 years old,80+ft tall),up until this year used to be full and healthy. Last year I trimmed the lower portion of the trunk by cutting off the low hanging branches, but this year so far my tree is not full, the strings are not bloomed with long healthy green leaves. I live in Philadelphia suburbs, I believe zone 6-8. The leaves are pale green and twisted, my landscaper said nothing wrong with it, I do not trust his answer.

ANSWER:

Thank you for your question. While we would like to answer all questions we receive, Mr. Smarty Plants' expertise is limited to plant species native to North America, their habitats and cultivation. Limited resources require us to decline answering questions that delve into other areas. We hope you understand.

Non-native to the United States, Salix x sepulcralis is a hybrid of a Chinese species (Peking willow) and a European species (white willow), and is said to grow in Zones 5 to 8 in the United States. It is weak-wooded, fast-growing and, therefore, short-lived. It has aggressive roots, can lift sidewalks and interfere with sewer lines, often growing on soil surface, making a problem with mowing. It is susceptible to a number of pests and diseases, and notorious for littering the ground beneath it. You might check out this University of Florida Extension website on Weeping Willows for more information as well as this Q&A from North Dakota State University Extension on weeping willows.The UBC Botanical Garden Forum is also a good source of information on non-native plants. 

 

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