Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - June 15, 2009

From: Midlothian, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Diseases and Disorders
Title: Why is my weeping willow looking so bad?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

My weeping willow suddenly up and looked like it died Yellow leaves dried up and dropping off It is planted in what is called "Wet lands" Clay soil water wet Just looks like it is dying

ANSWER:

When I search for Salix in our Native Plant Database, I come up with 55 species of Willow, but not Weeping Willow, because it is native to China, and outside the area of our expertise here at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica) is a widely used landscape tree that is elegant when healthy, but it is beset by numerous insect and fungal pests. This bulletin from Michigan State University Extension enumerates several problems with willows. To get some idea of the extent of problems with willows, check out the Hortiscope page of the University of South Dakota Extension Service which has numerous questions along with answers from people who are having trouble with their willow trees.

It is difficult, if not impossible for us to diagnose disease conditions from afar, so I am suggesting that you contact the folks at the Chesterfield County Office of the Virginia Cooperative Extension or a certified arborist in your area.

 

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Muhly grass slow to green up from Spring Hill FL
August 04, 2012 - Have lots of muhly grass planted 3 yrs ago. This yr about 1/3 are VERY slow. Still look like hay stacks. No pattern in the bed. You mentioned pesticides being too close?
view the full question and answer

Dealing with live oak suckers in Central Texas
March 05, 2015 - Hi, I have a couple huge Live Oak trees in my back yard. Trunks are 4' in diameter. These Live Oaks produce a lot of root sprouts/suckers. I had always head that a tree's roots feed on water/oxyg...
view the full question and answer

Root rot and transplant shock in Texas betony
July 13, 2006 - Texas betony is supposed to be drought resistant but also likes to be kept moist, but I have had trouble getting it established. These seem to be undemanding plants I have had entire stems dry up and...
view the full question and answer

Yaupons dying back in San Antonio
April 23, 2009 - I have 4 yaupon shrubs in the same area for several years. This past winter one turned brown from inside to outside very quickly. It is dead but the roots are not loose. The others began doing the sam...
view the full question and answer

Leaf drop from maple tree in Minnesota
August 15, 2008 - I have about a 30 ft maple tree in my yard, last fall I trimmed it pretty good because the branches were getting low where you could not walk under it or get grass to grow. This is the 2nd time in abo...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.