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Mr. Smarty Plants - Problems with non-native weeping willow

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Friday - April 17, 2009

From: Union City , GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders
Title: Problems with non-native weeping willow
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

The trunk of my Weeping Willow tree has raised donut growths.The left base has decay. There is a large space between the base and the soil (no roots) and the wood is brittle. Large ants with a black head and red body continuously trail the tree. The ant bed is approx 25 feet from the tree. Tree is healthy with new growth. Located near Atlanta GA layered soil, 5 ins of composted pine mulch, then clay. It is approx 5 yrs old.

ANSWER:

Thank you for your question. While we would like to answer all questions we receive, Mr. Smarty Plants' expertise is limited to plant species native to North America, their habitats and cultivation. Limited resources require us to decline answering questions that delve into other areas. We hope you understand.

Non-native to the United States, Salix x sepulcralis is a hybrid of a Chinese species (Peking willow) and a European species (white willow), and is said to grow in Zones 5 to 8 in the United States. It is weak-wooded, fast-growing and, therefore, short-lived. It has aggressive roots, can lift sidewalks and interfere with sewer lines, often growing on soil surface, making a problem with mowing. It is susceptible to a number of pests and diseases, and notorious for littering the ground beneath it. You might check out this University of Florida Extension website on Weeping Willows for more information as well as this Q&A from North Dakota State University Extension on weeping willows.The UBC Botanical Garden Forum is also a good source of information on non-native plants. 

 

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