En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Combining native shrubs for hedge in Austin

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - April 15, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Privacy Screening, Shrubs
Title: Combining native shrubs for hedge in Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Smarty, Please tell me what the definitions are for all the various water, soil moisture, drainage and light requirements mean. Are the definitions global? I live in Central East Austin and intended to plant my newly purchased Agaritas and Wax Myrtles together, but came home from the Wildflower Center and found they have different water and moisture requirements. So it looks like I may have to go to plan B and plant the Agarita with Yaupon Holly---will that pairing work? (I want to screen my neighbor's yard as well as provide habitat for wildlife that includes cottontails and roadrunners.) Sincerely, Confused

ANSWER:

We don't know about global definitions, but we can tell you what our definitions of some of the terms referring to various plants are:

Sun is 6 hours or more of sun daily, part shade 2 to 6 hours,  shade less than 2 hours of sun a day.

Good drainage means water does not stand on the surface of the soil for more than a few minutes. Especially in our alkaline soil, drainage is very important, and compost added to the soil will help just about any plant. The compost not only enriches the soil and improves its texture, but it helps to make trace elements necessary to the plant available in the soil. If you don't know what your drainage is, dig a hole, run water in it, and if water is still standing in it in about 30 minutes, you probably have clay soil and you definitely have poor drainage. 

Soil moisture refers to the normal condition of the soil when it hasn't been raining or watering has not  just occurred. Most of the soils in Austin would have to be considered dry. 

We recommend plants native not only to North America but to the area in which the plant is being grown, because those plants are already adapted to the climate, rainfall and soils. 

You are correct, while Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita) and Ilex vomitoria (yaupon) have low water requirements and do well in sun or part shade, as well as alkaline soil, Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) needs more moisture and does better in sandy, slightly acidic soil. The wax myrtle, while it will do okay in Central Texas, is more an East Texas kind of shrub. Trying to mix these shrubs in a hedge is going to be a little awkward as the agarita only grows to 3 to 5 ft., 8 ft. under favorable conditions. The yaupon grows from 12 to 25 ft. tall. If you're thinking of building a screen, you might have a problem with the fact that the agarita will not grow nearly as high as the yaupon. All three will serve your desire for attracting wildlife, but not necessarily a uniform hedge.  In general, a "mixed" hedge might be a little harder to care for and not as uniform looking. If you want to make a visual barrier, the yaupon is your best bet. If you want to have a physical barrier, agarita is the thing-it is thick and stickery-trespassing would be painful.

Yaupon and wax myrtle are listed as "dioecious," which means that only the females have berries and there must be a male of the same species, blooming at the same time, within 30 to 40 feet, for the berries to develop. If you had a hedge of 12 yaupons, for example, a couple of males in that hedge would assure berries on the females.


Mahonia trifoliolata

Mahonia trifoliolata

Ilex vomitoria

Ilex vomitoria

 

 

 

 

More Privacy Screening Questions

Evergreen hedge for constant rain
June 24, 2008 - We live in Washington State up north by Canadian border. We need a hedge that will survive the constant rain. We have tried cedar. They seem to turn brown and die,one at a time so we keep replacing th...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen screen for Michigan
June 15, 2009 - Hi Mr. Smarty Pants, I need help. Can you please suggest some (preferably evergreen) shrubs and trees that will thrive in our backyard that will provide us some privacy from our neighbors (about ...
view the full question and answer

Native shrubs for wildlife and screening in Georgia
December 22, 2008 - I live in Bainbridge, GA. I have 3 acres and want to plant for wildlife. I would like to plant fast growing native shrubs along the 400' of road that will benefit wildlife and shield us from the tr...
view the full question and answer

Fast-growing screen for New York
June 04, 2010 - I need a fast growing screen to put along my fence due to undesirable neighbors who moved next door to my summer place. Small lot: 25'x25' . The side is south and the lot is partially shade w sandy...
view the full question and answer

Blocking out noise from pond pump in Holly MI
April 02, 2010 - My neighbor has a motor for his pond pump that faces my backyard--it is extremely loud and irritating after listening to it for 5 hours or more. Is there any type of shrub that I can plant to block o...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center