Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - March 10, 2009

From: Palo Alto, CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Damage to non-native Japanese maple
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a medium sized branch of a dwarf outdoor Japanese maple partially (about 70%) broken off. How can I fix it? What chemical/plant hormone/material can I use to initiate regrowth of the broken part? What steps should I take? Please advise. Thanks

ANSWER:

We are sorry to hear about the damage to your tree, and wish there were such a product available. Very seldom will woody plants heal from even a small break in a branch, and there is no hormone or other substance that will inspire them to do so. The best thing to do is to carefully prune the damaged branch away from the tree. This article from Trees Are Good Pruning Young Trees has instructions and illustrations to help you help your tree.

The Japanese maple is a native of China and Japan, and therefore out of our range of expertise. At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, we are focused on the use, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being planted. Native plants which are accustomed to the climate, rainfall and soil of an area will need less fertilizer, water and maintenance. 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Eliminating non-native grasses growiing in non-native alfalfa in Clint, TX
April 16, 2011 - I have six acres of alfalfa in Clint, Tx which was planted three years ago. After taking it to Jaime Iglesias PhD, CEA-Agriculture Texas Agrilife Extension El Paso County; he responded: Mr. Zuniga: ...
view the full question and answer

Hybrid Campsis radicans 'Madame Rosy' from Medina OH
July 07, 2012 - I have a Madame Rosy Campsis that is not blooming. We purchased and planted it last year, mid-summer and it did well for the remainder of the season but this year...nothing but green leaves........wh...
view the full question and answer

Non-native. Why are my potted Royal Empress trees dying?
June 22, 2009 - I have purchased several Royal Empress trees over the past two years. Why won't they grow? Some sprouted leaves and then died while in the pots I planted them in. While others, that are 2 years old ...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen non-native herbs for Bastrop TX
August 26, 2010 - I'm looking for evergreen herbs for Bastrop Texas. I planted an herb garden in the spring of 2009, but mostly all of them died in the winter. Rosemary, Tarragon and Sage made it. thank you!
view the full question and answer

Non-flowering plants in Scottsdale AZ
July 01, 2013 - I have three plants that are supposed to do well in Arizona but mine are not flowering. The yellow bells and orange jubilee I have get full sun, drip watered 3 x a week for 1 1/2 hrs (at 4am) and are...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.