En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - January 11, 2009

From: Hamilton, NJ
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Care for non-native red orchid
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

In a nutshell, I was away for about a week and before leaving I watered my red orchid (as instructions said you were only supposed to water it once a week and place in a spot with sunlight but not direct/extreme sunlight). I came back from vacation and my plant is wilting! I of course am very sad, as this is my favorite plant and a birthday gift. How can I recover this plant? I need help!

ANSWER:

While there are orchids native to North America, Phalaenopsis corningiana (red orchid) is not one of them. Rather, it is a native of Borneo, probably quite a different environment than your home. At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, we are committed to the care, protection and propagation of plants native to North America, and recommend plants native to the area in which they are being grown. So, we have no knowledge of what might be wrong with your plant, nor information in our Native Plant Database. We did find information saying that this plant needs a strong humidity in the atmosphere, especially at night. In nature, night condensation covers the leaves abundantly. It is quite possible that the indoor environment, with a heating system, allowed your plant to dry out. About all we can suggest is lightly misting it in the evening, and see if it perks up. Here is an article about your plant, wildorchids.us Red orchid: A Rare and Extremely Exquisite Flower

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Use of non-native jasmine for wedding in Salt Lake City
January 08, 2010 - I am getting married mid summer in Salt Lake City. I want to incorporate jasmine plants/flowers into my bouquet, centerpieces, etc. Is that feasible living in Salt Lake City? Would they survive long e...
view the full question and answer

Growing non-native aloe in Seguin TX
March 17, 2009 - I would love to grow aloe plants; both because I like the look of them and for their medicinal properties. Here in Texas people grow them both indoors and out. For some reason, I have not had any l...
view the full question and answer

California plants poisonous to dogs from Sacramento
July 01, 2012 - Found dodonea viscosa purple. Is it poisonous to dogs? Also Gold Star Potentilla. Going drought tolerant and need small trees, shrubs and plants not poisonous to dogs for sun and partial sun.
view the full question and answer

Moving "lily of the valley" from MD to TX. Is that OK?
January 17, 2012 - My question pertains to lily of the valley. From your database, I learned that it is a native plant but only the following states were listed: GA , KY , NC , PA , SC , TN , VA , WV. I am moving from...
view the full question and answer

Why are the leaves on my Laurel hedge turning brown in Everett, WA?
February 22, 2010 - Our laurel hedge seems to have brown leaves on the top of the bush. We haven't had a freezing winter so we are trying to figure out why some of the leaves are brown.
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center