En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Propagation of non-native vitex

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Sunday - August 10, 2008

From: Carrboro, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Propagation of non-native vitex
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am interested in propagating a beautiful big vitex tree. Can I do it from seeds or what is the best way? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Vitex agnus-castus is a member of the Verbenaceae family, native to the woodlands and dry areas of Southern Europe and western Africa. It is hardy from USDA Hardiness Zones 6 to 10, and in north central North Carolina, it appears you are between Zones 7a and 7b, so you should have no problem growing this plant. It can be propagated by seed in the Spring and Fall or by cuttings which are easy to root in warm weather. We think you should also be aware that vitex is considered an invasive plant in several states. Please see this PlantWise page on Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants for vitex. A close relative, Vitex rotundifolia, Beach Vitex, is considered extremely invasive in North Carolina.

This USDA Forest Service website on Vitex agnus-castus will give you some more ideas on where and how it will grow. It can grow in part shade and full sun, and tolerates most soils as long as they are well-drained. In USDA Hardiness Zones 6b to 7, vitex can be killed to the ground by severe winters, but will come back from the roots, more often as a multi-stemmed shrub.

Seed: Sow in flats or even small paper cups in a good potting soil. The seed does not need pre-treatment and germination is usually quick. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a sheltered area for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in Spring of the following year.

Propagation by cuttings: Excellent instructions for the home gardener in this Horticulture Information Leaflet from North Carolina State University on Plant Propagation by Stem Cuttings. This site does not specifically list vitex, but we have learned from other sources that the same treatments may be used as are used on crape myrtles, which are listed.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Rust spots on non-native red tip photinia
July 10, 2008 - I live in Oklahoma and my red tips have rust spots on leaves and some plants are losing leaves. This is a clay soil; can you give me any info. on how to solve this problem?
view the full question and answer

Replacing non-native iceplant in El Cajon CA
June 11, 2010 - Help! We are clearing fungus dead iceplant on a massive steep bank. Should I avoid replacing it with more iceplant? Would myaporum prostrate be a better option? Fast growing, erosion resistant, zero m...
view the full question and answer

Care of non-native Sorbaria sorbifolia (false spiraea)
August 24, 2010 - I have 2 Sorbaria sorbifolia (false spiraea) that will not flower. This is their third summer. What should I do?
view the full question and answer

Replacements for non-native purple fountain grass in Austin
September 26, 2009 - Hi-- Just found out that the purple fountain grass I bought (fortunately on sale) is a) not native and b)not perennial. Dang it! If I can find the pots I'm taking it back. I have a part-shade wel...
view the full question and answer

Identification of insects on crepe myrtle in Florida
May 22, 2013 - I have large colonies of striped bugs on large crepe myrtle in my backyard. They stay in large groups and have long antennae. There are larger black bugs among the groups that appear to corral and g...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center