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Mr. Smarty Plants - Endemic plants for the Edwards Plateau

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Sunday - March 23, 2008

From: Leander, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany
Title: Endemic plants for the Edwards Plateau
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Thanks so much for the info. it will be very helpful with the boys and we really stress "Leave No Trace Behind". The pictures will be enough. Thanks again!!

ANSWER:

You're very welcome.

 

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