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Saturday - April 21, 2007

From: blanco, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Wildflower seeds that may be planted in late spring
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Monday April 09, 2007 Is it too late to plant wildflowers? I know nothing of the planting season of wildflowers however we are doing a residential ranch development and I would love to throw some seed out if its not too late already. Please advise on planting and where I might get a good wildflower/bluebonnet mix to throw out on the property. Thanks

ANSWER:

For flowers that bloom in the spring, such as bluebonnets and Indian paintbrush, it is too late to sow the seeds. Bluebonnets, in particular, should be planted in the fall so that the rosettes overwinter and produce blooms in the spring. Indeed, most wildflowers that bloom in the spring and even those that bloom in late summer and fall are best sown in the late fall and winter so that they benefit from experiencing the cold of the winter season that enhances germination in the spring. There are a few late summer/early fall wildflowers, however, that you could sow the seeds of now in Central Texas, e.g., Salvia greggii (Autumn sage), Monarda citriodora (horsemint) and Helianthus annuus (common sunflower).

It is also possible that you could find small bedding plants of native wildflowers that you could plant in beds. You can find nurseries that specialize in native plants in your area in our National Suppliers Directory. Plus, you can also find seed companies that specialize in native seeds so that you can prepare to sow your wildflower seeds in the fall this year. Native American Seeds is an excellent source for wildflower seeds and mixes for the Central Texas area.

 

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