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Plant Database

Search for native plants by scientific name, common name or family. If you are not sure what you are looking for, try the Combination Search or our Recommended Species lists.

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Desmodium psilophyllum (Beggar's ticks)
Loughmiller, Campbell and Lynn

Desmodium psilophyllum

Desmodium psilophyllum Schltdl.

Beggar's Ticks, Simpleleaf Ticktrefoil, Sticktights, Wright's Tickclover

Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Synonym(s): Desmodium wrightii, Meibomia psilophylla

USDA Symbol: DEPS2

USDA Native Status: L48 (N)

The little tickclover plants become a nuisance in the fall; their seeds are detached at the slightest touch and cling tenaciously to clothing by the numerous tiny, hooked hairs. The plant’s several branches grow from ground level, 1-2 feet tall. Leaves are alternate, 2-3 inches long and half that wide. Flowers are at the tops of the main stems, on 1/2-inch flower stems. They are light to dark pink, 1/4 inch long and 2-lipped.

 

From the Image Gallery

7 photo(s) available in the Image Gallery

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Herb
Flower:
Size Class: 1-3 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Pink , Purple
Bloom Notes: light pinkish purple fading to blue

Distribution

USA: AZ , NM , TX

Herbarium Specimen(s)

NPSOT 0657 Collected Jun 6 1992 in Medina County by Harry Cliffe
NPSOT 0925 Collected Sep 17, 1994 in Bexar County by Mike Fox
NPSOT 0675 Collected Jul 18, 1992 in Bandera County by Harry Cliffe
NPSOT 0608 Collected May 13, 1992 in Medina County by Harry Cliffe

4 specimen(s) available in the Digital Herbarium

Bibliography

Bibref 248 - Texas Wildflowers: A Field Guide (1984) Loughmiller, C. & L. Loughmiller

Search More Titles in Bibliography

Additional resources

USDA: Find Desmodium psilophyllum in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Desmodium psilophyllum in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Desmodium psilophyllum

Metadata

Record Modified: 2007-08-24
Research By: TWC Staff

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