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Wednesday - July 31, 2013

From: Huckabay, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Tree for fast shade in Huckabay, TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What tree should I plant for fast shade?

ANSWER:

Below is a list of fast-growing trees that should grow well in Erath County:

Ulmus americana (American elm) Here is more Information from Texas Tree Selector.

Chilopsis linearis (Desert willow)  Here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Fraxinus pennsylvanica (Green ash)  Here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Fraxinus albicans (Texas ash) [synonym-Fraxinus texensis]  Here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)  Here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Be sure to read the other criteria under GROWING CONDITIONS on each species page to see if they are compatible with your site.

 

From the Image Gallery


American elm
Ulmus americana

Desert willow
Chilopsis linearis

Green ash
Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Texas ash
Fraxinus albicans

American sycamore
Platanus occidentalis

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