Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - September 12, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Privacy Screening, Vines
Title: Is purple bindweed good for a screen growing on a fence?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We cleared a bunch of dead trees and tree limbs (mostly cedars and some oaks) on our semi-rural property in Driftwood and now we're left with an undesirable view onto the neighboring property. We're considering planting PURPLE BINDWEED so that it will grow over the metal wire fence and eventually create a screen. Your website indicates that it may be too aggressive for a garden setting. The area where we're considering planting it is more of a wild area than a garden setting. Everything in that area so far are only volunteer plants. We don't water that area at all. But we would water whatever we plant with a hose until it gets established. Is there a better plant for screening? The area is wild, and partly shady under/near cedars and oaks. Also, will it work on a metal fence or will it need some other kind of support?

ANSWER:

Ipomoea cordatotriloba var. cordatotriloba (Tievine) is described as an agressive grower but that sounds like what you are looking for.  Here's more information from University of Florida Extension Service and from Virginia Tech Weed ID.  You should have no problem growing it on the fence.  The University of Florida Extension Service site says that it has medium drought tolerance so you would need to keep that in mind for possible watering purposes.  It is rated as being highly deer resistant and it certainly is an attractive plant. The only drawback I can see is that it will be deciduous under winter condtions.  You might pair it with an evergreen (or semi-evergreen) native like Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle) that will retain most of its leaves in Travis County winters.

 

More Privacy Screening Questions

Tree for screening along road
August 20, 2008 - What would you recommend for a linear tree lined street that needs to act as a buffer to hide less desirable backyards of ugly houses. The road is on lake travis near austin, texas. was hoping for a...
view the full question and answer

Combining native shrubs for hedge in Austin
April 15, 2009 - Smarty, Please tell me what the definitions are for all the various water, soil moisture, drainage and light requirements mean. Are the definitions global? I live in Central East Austin and inten...
view the full question and answer

Small evergreen shrubs for part shade in Texas
January 31, 2015 - Mr. Smarty Pants, I'm, for some reason, at odds with myself about a shrub decision. I have need about 8 ft of hedge-like evergreen shrub(s) that I can maintain around 4ft to go under a window. It...
view the full question and answer

Screening plant for pool in Cleburne, Texas
March 15, 2009 - I recently put in a very large pool. I need to plant something for fast growing, taller than an 6 ft fence for privacy. The property isn't so appealing behind my pool. When standing on my deck, I ...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen tree for privacy screen in Granbury Texas
December 21, 2014 - We need to put an evergreen privacy screen between our barn and our neighbor's new 132' long, unattractive building, which runs along & is just 40' away from our fence line & where they have decid...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.