Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - August 16, 2012

From: Glendora, CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Growing Citrus Trees in Glendora CA
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

We're considering moving to Glendora, CA (from the East Coast) and wondered if it is possible to successfully grow orange and other citrus trees that far inland? Any advice you can offer will be much appreciated! Thanks, Kevin

ANSWER:

The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.  As such, we really don’t have much information on Citrus trees as they are imports from Southeast Asia and have pretty much been introduced almost anywhere that you will find them!

  Having stated the official line, Mr Smarty Plants doesn’t think you’ll have much trouble growing well chosen varieties of citrus there.  In fact, while checking out the general area, I found out that Glendora is in an area called  “Citrus Valley”. 

Still, to get good information, I would recommend contacting the local UC Davis Agricultural Extension office or perhaps a local gardening club.

[The pictures below are some colorful non-Citrus California natives]

 

From the Image Gallery


Lewis' mock orange
Philadelphus lewisii

California poppy
Eschscholzia californica

Creeping barberry
Mahonia repens

More Non-Natives Questions

Has Texas Black Persimmon been crossed with non-native persimmons from Austin
August 17, 2013 - Hi. I just found a Texas Black Persimmon in my neighborhood. The fruit is olive green and then black, then it explodes into a black slurry of seeds and syrup. The color is so strong I find myself wond...
view the full question and answer

Non-native carrotwood tree in Simi Valley CA
June 25, 2009 - We have a beautiful 40+ foot carrotwood tree that has been covered with small nut-like pods growing in bunches. They are a mess. Is there a spray that controls/eliminates this problem?
view the full question and answer

Distribution vs. Native Distribution in NPIN?
September 27, 2013 - I'm a Habitat Steward in Austin and conducting a native plant swap tomorrow, 9/28/13. I need to be able to tell people who come whether their plant is native or not. I want to use your smart phone ...
view the full question and answer

Failure to thrive of non-native Confederate Jasmine in Tucson AZ
May 27, 2010 - My Star/Confederate Jasmine, a 30 foot long wall of it, for over 5 years now has one side of it losing leaves. I seem to remember it did this one other summer, but came back in?? What could be the pr...
view the full question and answer

Cutting back non-native oleanders affected by freeze in Austin
January 30, 2010 - After the last hard freeze makes my oleanders look dead. Can I cut them down to the ground this time of year?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.