Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - May 03, 2012

From: Concord, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Planting, Erosion Control, Grasses or Grass-like, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs
Title: Steep slope from Charlotte NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live near Charlotte, NC and I have a very steep sloped area from the edge of our front yard down to the road. It's a huge eyesore mainly because it is red clay dirt and has nothing growing on it. We also have two very large trees directly beside the hills so it gives us a very hard time with all of the roots. Please help, what plant - annual flower/vine - do you recommend and what do I do to make sure it grows?

ANSWER:

Boy, you do have problems with clay slopes in North Carolina. We did a quick scan of previous Mr. Smarty Plant questions on this subject and found several that had good answers and even plant lists, and all from North Carolina.

Durham, NC - Durham County, very close to Wake and Chatham Counties

Cary, NC - Wake and Chatham Counties

Charlotte, in Mecklenburg County, is on the central southern border of North Carolina with South Carolina.

So, we're thinking that the plant lists and instructions on the previous questions should be of help to you, and we won't be repeating ourselves. As for making them grow, you have made a vital first step in using plants native to the region. Follow each plant link on the lists of plants to our webpage on that plant, and read how much moisture, sunlight, etc. it needs and place the plants accordingly in your garden.

 

 

 

More Shrubs Questions

Shrub or small tree for hedgerow to block view
November 06, 2007 - For property in the Post Oak Savanah area of Eastern Texas, north of Bryan, Texas, I would like to plant a native hedgerow to block the view of a neighboring property. Ideally this would be a shrub t...
view the full question and answer

Rust on Amelancier Foliage in PA
February 03, 2015 - I live in Pennsylvania and have been plagued with a rust on my serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis) trees over the past few years. I am unable to find very much information on this disease on the we...
view the full question and answer

Pride of Barbados seed for Ft. Worth TX
February 07, 2013 - When can you plant the Pride of Barbados plant seeds and how to go about it in Fort Worth Texas?
view the full question and answer

Evergreen shrub/tree for British Columbia.
May 28, 2008 - What kind of hedge or trees might work to provide privacy in our lower mainland British Columbia yard/garden? We need something evergreen that is perhaps,fast growing. Our yard is not deep and our k...
view the full question and answer

Low Ground Cover for Steep, Shaded PA Site
February 17, 2014 - I am located in Downingtown, PA, right on the border between Zone 6 and 7. Please provide a recommendation of a native ground cover for the following conditions: steep slope (greater than 45%), full s...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.