Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - May 03, 2012

From: Kerrville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany, Non-Natives
Title: Kerrville Soil for Vegetables
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

We are moving to our vacation home in Kerrville, TX and plan on putting in a vegetable garden on the sunny north side of our house. I'm assuming that your answer to the person inquiring about "soil improvement in Kerrville" would also apply to our situation, but since we're wanting to grow vegetables and not flowers, I thought there might be some slight differences in your response. We, of course, would have the same native soil content as the other person.

ANSWER:

Well..... Officially Mr Smarty Plants doesn't do vegetables, check out this earlier response!  Now that the official party line is stated we [shush] grow and eat them happily, but don't claim any expertise.

To be clear, here's our older answer. In comparison to that, vegetables, as non-natives, will likely need richer soil and more care. I'd be adding more compost and perhaps being a bit more selective as to it's origins [I do intend to eat the produce after all].  It would be a good idea to get your soil tested for nutrients.  Good references that are supposed to know about local gardening conditions include a gardening club and/or the local extension office.  Here's a listing for the local gardening club and here is the webpage for the Kerr County Extension Office.

 

More General Botany Questions

Growth on top of Echinacea purpurea (Eastern purple coneflower)
July 03, 2012 - I grow purple coneflowers in my garden. ONE plant has something growing on the top of each cone. I would like to know what it is but I don't see how I can add a photo to this post.
view the full question and answer

Information about glucose concentration in plants for Science Fair project
October 24, 2007 - I am a high school student enrolling in science fair. MY topic is as follows, "Can a plant be removed from the sun and put in dark and still survive if I directly inject glucose into the stem/roots (...
view the full question and answer

Ruffly foliage on native lantana
November 05, 2013 - A native lantana in my front yard has developed ruffly foliage on one stem. It looks like miniature broccoli. What can this be?
view the full question and answer

Possible reasons for yellow heads for Indian Blanket
December 13, 2005 - I had Indian Blanket flowers that had almost pure yellow heads. Will the seeds of these flowers produce plants that will have yellow flowers?
view the full question and answer

Fasciation on Texas Mountain Laurel
November 21, 2012 - Do Texas Mountain Laurel normally have a staghorn looking growth hanging on them after blooming in addition to the seed pod clusters or could this be a mutation?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.