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Thursday - April 05, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Day trips for wildflower viewing from Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in Austin, Texas. Where is the best place for bluebonnet viewing? Or a day trip to see wildflowers? Thank you.

ANSWER:

You could begin with the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, because we live in Austin, too. Here is information on Wildflower Days, our hours, admission, etc. The weather has been beautiful, the Gardens are full of blooms of all kinds, including the bluebonnets.The architecture and design of the Gardens are worth a trip all by themselves.

In Austin, you can go south on Loop 1 (MoPac) to Lacrosse (the last traffic light going south on Loop 1), turn left and there you are at the Center. We suggest you do not come from April 13 to 15 because our Spring Plant Sale is going on at the Wildflower Center, with plants native to Central Texas on sale, but it is very crowded. Unless you are interested in filling your Austin garden with Central Texas natives, in which case, here  is information on the Spring Plant Sale.

Now, if you want a day trip out of Austin, consider first going west on Highway 290. Here is a website On the Trail of Bluebonnets, which originates from Fredericksburg. If you leave Austin on US 290 going west, you will get to Fredericksburg. Go east out of Austin on Highway 290 and you will come to first Brenham and then Chappell Hill.

We would suggest, if you are chiefly interested in bluebonnets, you might do your sightseeing trip soon. Because of the winter rains, the blooming started pretty early and is still growing strong, but the normal end to the season is the end of April. But, there will be lots of other wildflowers still blooming all around Austin and Central Texas. Some perennial wildflowers can bloom 12 months a year, and others have seasons beginning in Summer and extending into Fall. Go to Wildflowers of Central Texas for a slideshow of the popular wildflowers you can see through the year in this area.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

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