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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Friday - June 24, 2011

From: Pocatello, ID
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native little leaf linden (Tilia cordata)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the name of the little leaf linden that has no flowers or pods to shed?

ANSWER:

Tilia cordata (little leaf linden) is a non-native tree from Europe.  As such, it isn't really within our purview since our focus and expertise is with plants native to North America.  If you search on the scientific name on Google, you might be able to find the variety without flowers or fruit—although I didn't after a quick search. 

There is a North American native linden, Tilia americana (American basswood).  Instead of the European Linden tree, why not consider the native one for your garden.

 

From the Image Gallery


American basswood
Tilia americana

American basswood
Tilia americana

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