Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - June 09, 2011

From: Charlottesville, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native impatiens from Charlottesville VA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Question about type of impatiens. My Alabama mother grew these and called them touch-me-not. They grow about 2 feet tall and blooms grow UNDER the leaf canopy up the stem. Colors I have are pale pink and fushia. Seed pods are similar to common impatiens only larger. What lighting and other conditions are needed?

ANSWER:

According to this Dave's Garden forum, Impatiens balsamina has the common name of "touch-me-not." According to this USDA Plant Profile, its common name is "spotted snapweed."

This plant is native to Tropical Asia, including India and Myanmar. As such, they do not fall into our realm of expertise, nor appear in our Native Plant Database. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is committed to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. Here is an article on How to Care for Impatiens which we hope will help you.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Problems with non-native closet plant
November 23, 2008 - I have three closet plants. All are putting on new growth and even blooming. However, the leaves are turning brown from the edges. What is the problem?
view the full question and answer

Non-native Cape Honeysuckle, Tecomaria capensis
March 13, 2006 - I am trying to find general information on the Cape Honeysuckle or "Tecomaria" bush/plant. Is is related to the actual Honeysuckle Plant? What is it's care, propogation, sun tolerance, water requ...
view the full question and answer

Plants for church gardens in Ft. Worth TX
November 07, 2013 - Second attempt. Our church has many gardens in Fort Worth, TX. There are gardens for blue,red,yellow,white,purple,orange,pink,mixed,community garden,roses, and more. I am interested in the la...
view the full question and answer

Plant identification of bamboo-like plant in California
January 10, 2014 - We just bought a house in Cambria, CA. The plant I'd like to ID grows like bamboo -- spreading fibrous stalks abt 6' high with beautiful orange blossoms that protrude out the top of the stalk. The...
view the full question and answer

Water for non-native Sub-Zero ivy in El Paso
March 25, 2011 - Sub-Zero Ivy: Do they require lots of water - I live El Paso, TX - dry climate. Are they dangerous to dogs? Will they do well as ground cover around a brick patio? - Thanks!
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.