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Friday - July 23, 2010

From: Port St Lucie, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagation of Cordyline fruticosa from Port St. Lucie FL
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Hawaiian Ti Plant, Good Luck Plant, Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa) I found 4 of these cut without roots. What is the best way to have them grow roots? Directly in water, moist soil, or regular soil?

ANSWER:

From a Floridata site, Cordyline fruticosa, we found the following instructions for the stems you found:

"Propagation: It is easy to propagate from stem cuttings, called "logs." Cut 3-5 in (7-12 cm) sections of mature stem, remove the leaves, and place on a bed of sand, preferably with bottom heat. The "eyes" on the stem cuttings will grow into shoots with leaves. When a shoot gets 4-6 leaves, cut it and its eye from the log, and root in potting medium as you would any cutting." 

Cordyline fruticosa (tiplant) is a shrub or small tree occurring in Australia and on many of the larger islands in the South Pacific including the Hawaiian Islands, to which it is considered native. 

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Cordyline fruticosa

Cordyline fruticosa

 

 

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