Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - July 01, 2010

From: El Paso, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Planting, Trees
Title: Distance apart to plant Arizona ash trees in El Paso, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How far apart can I plant two Arizona ash trees?

ANSWER:

Fraxinus velutina (velvet ash) is a moderately fast-growing tree, appropriate for your area of El Paso County, TX. According to this Pima Co. Arizona Extension Office website, the Arizona Ash will grow to a height of 30 to 50 ft., with a spread approximately 2/3 of the height. We would say a distance between trunks of 15 ft. would be about right. The same article says of this tree: "large tree, out of scale for most residences." So you might be happier with just one tree. And we sure hope you are planning your Fall planting, because you should not try to plant this tree or any other woody plant in Arizona until late Fall, when the plant will be semi-dormant and temperatures lower. If you have already purchased your trees and they are standing in black plastic nursery pots on your property, you need to get them in the ground fast, first preparing the hole with some compost, and then watering by pushing the hose down deep in the soil and letting the water dribble until water appears on the surface. Do this about every other day until it looks like the tree will survive.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery


Fraxinus velutina

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Trees with non-invasive roots for California
March 30, 2009 - My family is currently in the process of redoing our entire yard. A huge task I might add! We had fruitless mulberries planted and one Modesto Ash. As much as we loved them we are hating their roots. ...
view the full question and answer

Live oak trees with rusty spots and holes on tree trunks
September 21, 2011 - I have live oak trees that have developed rusty spots, small holes on the tree trunks and sawdust on the trees base. They were planted in Oct 2010. We have had a hot dry summer in Texas this year an...
view the full question and answer

Problems with Mexican Olive tree from Edinburg TX
October 06, 2013 - My Mexican olive (anacahuita) shows no obvious signs of pest or disease, but over the last years has more and more dead limbs and smaller and smaller leaves. It's in a yard with a sprinkler system t...
view the full question and answer

Is Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) really native to the Texas Hill Country?
October 12, 2010 - I had heard that the Ashe Juniper was not native to the hill country or even Texas. Is this true? What is their history? They sure make it hard for the elms and oaks to thrive. We have decided to re...
view the full question and answer

Native Texas tree for anniversary in Austin
May 20, 2009 - My husband and I would like to plant a tree in our yard commemorating our 5 year anniversary (wood anniversary). What native Texas tree can we plant in June? I love Red buds and any pretty blooming ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.