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Saturday - June 12, 2010

From: Springfield, KY
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Groundcovers, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs
Title: Plants for pool area in Kentucky
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We live in central Kentucky and have a backyard pool that desperately needs some landscaping. I would like plants that don't drop a lot of leaves or "trash". I'd like a list of great poolside plants, ground cover, shrubs for this area. Many thanks!

ANSWER:

You can find a list of commercially available native plants suitable for landscaping on the Kentucky Recommended page.   I've picked a few from that list and added a few others that would do nicely near your pool.  Since I don't know the exact growing conditions at your site (e.g., available sun and moisture) you should read the GROWING CONDITIONS section on each species page to be sure that they fit those of your site.

LOW-GROWING PLANTS/GROUNDCOVERS:

Glandularia bipinnatifida (Dakota mock vervain)

Fragaria virginiana (Virginia strawberry)

Oenothera speciosa (pinkladies)

Phyla nodiflora (turkey tangle fogfruit)

Salvia lyrata (lyreleaf sage)

TALLER HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS:

Conoclinium coelestinum (blue mistflower)

Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)

Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot)

Phlox divaricata (wild blue phlox)

Lobelia cardinalis (cardinalflower)

SHRUBS:

Comptonia peregrina (sweet fern)

Hypericum prolificum (shrubby St. Johnswort)

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle)

Hydrangea arborescens (wild hydrangea)

Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel)

Here are photos from our Image Gallery:


Glandularia bipinnatifida

Fragaria virginiana

Oenothera speciosa

Phyla nodiflora

Salvia lyrata

Conoclinium coelestinum

Rudbeckia hirta

Monarda fistulosa

Phlox divaricata

Lobelia cardinalis

Comptonia peregrina

Hypericum prolificum

Morella cerifera

Hydrangea arborescens

Kalmia latifolia

 

 

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