Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Thursday - October 15, 2009

From: Duluth, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: New plant introductions in Georgia.
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Can you list 5-10 brand new plants to the marketplace this 2009-2010 season for my area in GA? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks you might be a little unclear on the function of the Native Plant Information Network and the mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.  We study and advocate for the use of wildflfowers and other native plants in their native areas.

Most new introductions to the horticulture market are cultivars of non-native species.  While it is certainly possible that someone has introduced some native plant species to the marketplace, it is very unlikely that anyone has introduced five to ten new ones in Georgia this year.

The Horticulture Department at the University of Georgia, under the direction of Dr. Allan Armitage maintains a The Trial Gardens at UGA for landscape testing new plant introductions.  He has also developed a marketing program called Athens Select which promotes especially well-adapted cultivars of intoduced plants.  These resources may be of value to you.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Cutting back non-native oleanders affected by freeze in Austin
January 30, 2010 - After the last hard freeze makes my oleanders look dead. Can I cut them down to the ground this time of year?
view the full question and answer

Reference for native critical populations from York, PA
May 25, 2010 - I have recently read a naysayer of native gardening. He states that native garden plants usually do not have the critical population size to be self-perpetuating. He says that one could better help t...
view the full question and answer

Care for non-native plumeria in Inverness FL
October 05, 2009 - I have several plumeria plants that I planted in the ground this spring. I will soon need to dig them up and store them in the garage for the winter, as I left some last year that died with the frost...
view the full question and answer

Hardiness of non-native Lycium barbarum for Saschatewan
December 19, 2005 - Lycium barbarnum. What is its hardiness and where can it be grown?
view the full question and answer

Mediterranean Pines indigenous to Verde Valley AZ
January 01, 2012 - Are the tall, thin Mediterranean/Pencil Pines growing in the Verde Valley in Arizona indigenous to the area? They are so plentiful, but are not identified as an indigenous evergreen. If not, how did...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.