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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Sunday - May 31, 2009

From: Hartford, CT
Region: Northeast
Topic: Edible Plants
Title: Recommendation for red raspberry species for Connecticut
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, I was wondering if you could recommend any red raspberries that I can grow in Connecticut. Thanks!

ANSWER:

Here are the raspberry species native to Connecticut:

Rubus idaeus (American red raspberry)

Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus (grayleaf red raspberry)

Rubus occidentalis (black raspberry) with photos and more information

Rubus odoratus (purpleflowering raspberry)

Rubus odoratus ssp. odoratus (purpleflowering raspberry)

These five species would certainly grow in Connecticut.  However, if you are looking for which of these species will be the best producer, your best bet is to contact the Home and Garden Education Center of the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension Service. You can search for an Extension Expert there who knows the species that grows and produce the best in your area.


Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus

Rubus odoratus

 

 

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