Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Friday - May 29, 2009

From: Lone Jack, MO
Region: Midwest
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: Removal of poison ivy by goat in Lone Jack MO
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Easy organic removal of poison ivy?? I bought a goat, but you can borrow a neighbors. Always get 2 as they get lonely. They love to eat poison ivy, pull up vine roots and all, and leave the grass.

ANSWER:

We don't know how to tell you this, but we don't have a goat, and our neighbor doesn't have a goat, and the Homeowner's Association would have a fit if we got a goat. In fact, in Texas, goat is most often the honored guest (and entree) at a barbecue. We found this website poisonivy.aesir Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac Information site with the same information, very briefly stated, and a whole lot of other more practical, useful information. And we don't want to be indelicate, but when the goat finishes processing the poison ivy, has the poisonous content been counteracted, or are there just fresh seeds (fertilized free of charge) available for more Toxicodendron radicans (eastern poison ivy)?


Toxicodendron radicans

Toxicodendron radicans

Toxicodendron radicans

Toxicodendron radicans

 

 

 

More Invasive Plants Questions

removing paper mulberry shoots from lawn
August 09, 2011 - Dear Mr./Ms. Smartypants, I recently moved into an Austin home with the backyard taken over by paper mulberries. There were originally 2-3 large bush/trees, but now that I've removed them I realiz...
view the full question and answer

Removing St. Augustine, replacing with native plants
October 06, 2007 - Hello Mr. Smarty Plants, always excited to talk to the Green Guru himself. I've recently purchased a house in South Austin and am interested in establishing a small, 500+ sq ft, prairie grass and wi...
view the full question and answer

Source for non-native, invasive Winter Honeysuckle from Austin
April 24, 2013 - Seeing Lonicera abiflora today reminds me of the "winter honeysuckle" my grandfather grew in San Antonio from 1920s or so through the 1950's. It was a bush with stiff upright stems and bloomed cre...
view the full question and answer

Introduction of King Ranch bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemem)
August 04, 2008 - Hello, I am a graduate student from TAMUK and I'm writing my thesis concerning natives vs. Old World Bluestems. I was wondering if you could help me find a source that states: King Ranch (or KR) Blu...
view the full question and answer

Mowing wildflower concerns from Lockhart TX
March 30, 2012 - I went to the Texas Highway Department (Texas Department of Transportation) web site and sent them a concern or complaint about them or independent contractors shredding the roadsides before the blueb...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.