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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Friday - March 06, 2009

From: Glasgow, Other
Region: Other
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Question about non-native tree hardiness
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hi there, im wondering if you can help me. Which of these plants can grow on poorly drained soils. Tamarix Tetandra, weigela 'moulin rogue', ulex europaeus or salix alba?

ANSWER:

Our focus and expertise here at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is on North American native plants.  None of the plants you named is native to North America, although they have all been introduced to a greater or lesser extent here.

Tamarix parviflora (syn. Tamarix tetrandra) is a native of southeastern Europe and was introduced into the U.S. in the 1800s and now considered invasive over much of the U.S.

Weigela spp. are native to eastern Asia.

Ulex europaeus (gorse) is, as the implies, native to Europe and is listed as a noxious weed in California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. 

Salix alba (white willow) is also a native of Europe.

Since these species are out of purview and you are asking for advice about planting in Scotland, I'm afraid we are not the source to help you.  I suggest you visit the Gardening Advice page of the  Royal Horticultural Society, the BBC Gardening page, or GardenAdvice.co.uk.   You can find more UK garden advice pages by Googling 'gardening advice UK'.

 

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