Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - March 09, 2009

From: North St Paul, MN
Region: Midwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Will my Lisianthus survive the winter in Minnesota for another growing season?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Do you know if Lisianthus plants planted one year, will come back the next year? We bought 6 gorgeous healthy plants last summer from a MN grower. We enjoyed them all last Summer and are wondering if they will survive our winter for another growing season?

ANSWER:

Lisianthus  is one of several common names associated with this plant. It is also referred to as Prairie Gentian, Prairie Rose or Texas Bluebell. The scientific name is Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum (showy prairie gentian). The plants that are grown today are derived from an American wildflower that is native to the prairie from Colorado to Nebraska and down to Texas. The wild, native plant has blue flowers; however, commercial breeders have developed plants with larger blooms in a wide color palette. Our NPIN database describes Lisianthus as an annual, a biennial, or a perennial, depending on where the plant is grown. In the southern part of of its native range, it is a perennial. The survival of your plants is also largely dependent on how they were treated over the winter.

I'm going to refer you to a link where a grower describes his experiences with Lisianthus in Chicago.


Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum

 



 

More Propagation Questions

Seed propagation for Goldeneye Sunflower for Austin
October 30, 2010 - I have been unable to find Golden Eye seed, and am therefore thinking about harvesting seed from existing plants. My question is: At what stage of the development do I make the harvest of fully develo...
view the full question and answer

Germinating Mexican Persimmon seeds in Austin, TX.
November 15, 2011 - I'm planning to germinate Mexican Persimmon seeds, and plant them this spring. I want a female for fruit. Is there any way to encourage a plant to be female, and if not, is there any way you can iden...
view the full question and answer

Blossoms but no fruit for gooseberries in Enoch UT
January 16, 2010 - My gooseberries always get loads of blossoms, but I never get fruit. I think they need more sun, and thus, want to transplant them to a sunnier location. What (and when) is the best way to do this?
view the full question and answer

Looking for an apple tree to plant in Austin, TX.
December 08, 2010 - I want to plant an apple tree in my yard that bears fruit and will provide habitat and shade. Are any varieties that will do well in the South Austin area? And do I have to plant two trees to get fru...
view the full question and answer

Can I Grow Beautyberry
December 30, 2011 - Will try to be brief. Beautyberry sprouted leaves in vase of branches in water. It's NYC beginning of winter. Can I plant it outside? If not will it grow in a pot inside? Thanks. Happy New Ye...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.