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Thursday - December 18, 2008

From: Abilene, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Proper method of scattering bluebonnet seeds
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I scattered about 20 lbs of bluebonnet seeds during various times this past fall season. I have read that it is a must to plant the seeds about an 1/8" of an inch into the ground rather than surface sow them in fear that the birds will get to them. My question is, since Mother Nature surface sows the Bluebonnet seeds during the spring time, why is it that the birds don't get to them then? Thanks !

ANSWER:

Because there is no perfect way to sow seeds to prevent damage by insects, being eaten by birds, being blown to inhospitable dirt (like pavement), or too much/too little water most plants make LOTS of seeds, and bluebonnets are no exception. The mother plant doesn't carefully select the right place and then tenderly rake them in, she just lets 'em go. We have no figures on what percentage of seeds actually make it from the seed pod to the point of becoming another full-grown plant, but it's probably not very large. The thing is, Nature has very kindly provided our beautiful bluebonnets, and all the other plants that grow from seeds in the world, survival tactics. They can hunker down in the soil, and wait years for the right conditions to appear. They can become food for animals and birds, thus helping them to survive. They can hide in the grass from predators, blending in to the soil, "disappearing" from sight, or they may prove never to have been viable, no matter how protected and perfectly planted they have been. Some processes we just can't control. Read our How-To Article How to Grow Bluebonnets for some more suggestions on propagation of the Texas state flower. 


Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

 

 

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