Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - September 02, 2008

From: Chippewa Falls, WI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Planting instructions for Ilex verticillata in Wisconsin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We have a winterberry tree and we would like to grow another one in a different area. Can we transplant part of that or do we need to start from scratch? How would we know what the male plant looks like? When is the best time to plant? What would we need from the orginal tree?

ANSWER:

The male of the Ilex verticillata (common winterberry) has no berries. In Wisconsin, the best time to plant is early Spring, when the soil begins to warm. It is probably a little late to plant it now, as an early frost could damage or kill the little plant. You must have both a male and female plant to have berries. The male must be the same species as the female and bloom at the same time. Because hollies are such popular landscape plants, it may be worth the risk to plant a female and hope there is a male nearby.

Plants can be propagated by taking cuttings from the original plant. The problem is, it will probably be four to five years before any of the plants are ready to bloom and have berries. You would have to take and cultivate a number of cuttings to assure having one or more viable plants result. This article, Plant Propagation by Stem Cuttings (North Carolina State University Horticulture Information Leaflets) will give you the information you need about what part of the plant to take cuttings from and when to do it.

 

More Propagation Questions

How close to a male tree will a new female persimmon need to be planted to ensure pollination in Austin, TX?
June 17, 2009 - I have a male Texas Persimmon in the back corner of my yard. I would like to plant a female Texas Persimmon in the front yard, more than 100 feet away? How far away do you think they should be place...
view the full question and answer

Accurate bloom time for Mistflower from Spring TX
July 25, 2012 - Regarding Mistflower (Conoclinium coelestinum): Your site lists July to November as blooming time, while Wildflowers of Texas (Agilvsgi, Shearer Publishing, 2003) and Native Texas Plants (Wasowski, Lo...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting a Dutchman's pipe in Beaverton MI
June 10, 2010 - When can I transplant a full grown dutchmans pipe plant? It is growing along side of the house and it needs a bigger place to grow. This is June and the plant is in full bloom full of pipes, but need...
view the full question and answer

Why is my yaupon tree not producing berries in Metairie La?
November 04, 2009 - What is the lifespan of a Yaupon Tree? We live in Louisiana, and our Yaupon would always get the white flowers in the Spring but never the red berries. Why is that?
view the full question and answer

Tiger lilies for Austin
July 12, 2007 - My dear friend absolutely loves tiger lilies, and I would love to plant some for her, but I wonder if the short winters here in Austin, TX make growing these difficult.. I know little of growing flowe...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.