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Sunday - August 24, 2008

From: Aledo, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Getting rid of rain lilies in Aledo, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How do I get rain lilies to stop growing in my yard?

ANSWER:

It was brought to our attention, after this answer was published, by a smarter member of the Mr. Smarty Plants team than this one, that the rain lilies in this case are probably native Cooperia drummondii (evening rainlily), rather than the non-native Zephyranthes grandiflora. Rain lilies seem to be so popular you might be able to get rid of them by offering them free to anyone who wants to come and dig them out. It would be well to stipulate that they dig the bulbs out with the smallest possible interference with the other plants in your garden. They bloom, and then they disappear so quickly, it doesn't seem they would be that much of a nuisance. If you're still determined they have to go, pop the bulbs out of the ground and dispose of them yourself. Mowing them, or cutting off the tops, will not deter them, since they are bulbs, with food stored up in the bulb, waiting for the first good day to start growing again.


Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

 

 

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