Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Thursday - March 27, 2008

From: RALEIGH , NC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Wildlife Gardens
Title: Host plant for butterflies in North Carolina
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What is the best host plant for butterflies in North Carolina?

ANSWER:

Begin by reading our "How To" article on Butterfly Gardening. Near the end of the article, seven plants native to North America are listed as good attractors of butterflies. Of these, Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed), Monarda didyma (scarlet beebalm), and Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan) all can be found growing naturally in North Carolina. Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) is a personal favorite, as a nectar source, food for butterfly larvae and really bright and lovely flowers.


Asclepias tuberosa

Monarda didyma

Rudbeckia hirta

 

 

More Wildlife Gardens Questions

Plants that ducks and geese will not eat
March 23, 2009 - Hello, I have a pet duck and goose. Who I love dearly and have built two ponds for.. one 4ft deep the other 6ft deep. The ponds are for their use, first and for most, but I would like to have a plan...
view the full question and answer

Plants for no sun in Austin
May 12, 2010 - I need recommendations for shrubs that can withstand no sun, something that possibly blooms but does not attract bees, wasps, or any stinging insects (hummingbirds or butterflies ok).
view the full question and answer

Host plants to monarch butterflies in Starr County, TX
July 14, 2005 - I plant native larval and nectar plants that support the life cycle of the monarch butterfly here in the east; but, where can I find a list of native plants for my friends in the Tamaulipan Biotic P...
view the full question and answer

Wildlife benefit of western coneflower (Rudbeckia occidentalis)
October 16, 2007 - A neighbor and I are planting a nearby waste area. I'd like to plant things that will help any wildlife that's managed to survive, probably birds. I may be able to get Western Coneflower (Rudbeckia ...
view the full question and answer

Native Ohio Shubs for Wildlife
July 20, 2015 - Hi, I'm looking to plant shrubs and bushes for in front of our home this week but would like to plant some that are good for wildlife including bees and birds. Do you have any suggestions for norther...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.