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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Saturday - May 12, 2007

From: Garland, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildlife Gardens, Xeriscapes, Shrubs
Title: Recommendations for native plants for Dallas Co., TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Looking for a Recommendation: Can you suggest a plant that meets the following requirements? ENVIRONMENT -- - I live in Garland, in Dallas County, TX. - The soil is primarily clay. - Full sun in most locations. PLANT REQUIREMENTS -- - Needs to grow at least 6 feet tall on average. - The less water it needs, the better. (Xeriscape-grade.) - Must be 'productive'; bearing edible fruit or seeds. I'm trying to line a fence that faces a street. The "fuller" and "bushier" the plants, the better, for noise reduction.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants can think of three plants that fit your requirements: Morella cerifera (wax myrtle), Rhus virens (evergreen sumac, and Ilex vomitoria (yaupon.

All three are evergreen, relatively fast-growing, and once established, require little water. They have flowers that attract bees and butterflies and berries that attract birds. All three occur in, or adjacent to, Dallas County, Texas.

 

From the Image Gallery


Wax myrtle
Morella cerifera

Evergreen sumac
Rhus virens

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

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