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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Thursday - February 11, 2016

From: Salado, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Groundcovers
Title: Vinca as a groundcover
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Someone told me that Vinca would be a great ground cover for my very large mostly shaded area. How can I establish it and where can I get it? Thanks in advance.

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center would not recommend either Vinca major or Vinca minor since both are native to Europe and Asia and are considered invasive because they grow and take over areas where our native plants grow.  There are several native groundcover plants that we can recommend that will do well in your mostly shady areas.

You can check our National Suppliers Directory for nurseries and seed companies near you that specialize in native plants.  Native American Seed in Junction, Texas has a few of these available.  The Wildflower Center Spring Plant Sale occurs in April 2016—April 9 for members only, April 10-11 for the general public.  Check the Spring Plant Sale page closer to the time of the sale for lists of plants available at the sale.

 

 

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