Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - October 02, 2015

From: Manchaca , TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Meadow Gardens, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Invasiveness of Oenothera speciosa?
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

Hello! I received a large package of Oenothera speciosa seeds and would like to plant them this month. I've read elsewhere that they can choke out out other plants and am wondering to what degree this is accurate. I'd like to add them to a raised berm which contains Texas Mountain Laurel, Opuntia, Rosemary, Evergreen Sumac and various wildflowers. In lieu of that, I could plant them in wild space. Thanks for your insights.

ANSWER:

Guy

Oenothera speciosa (Pink evening primrose) should not interfere with the plants that you mentioned, except possibly for the "various wildflowers".  Evening primrose can sprall and form a fairly dense and spectacular mat in the spring.  After they finish blooming the foliage tends to die back or can be cut back to accommodate other flowers.  Being perennials, they will reappear next spring.

For a nice display, I would recommend planting the seeds in patches on your berm so that they will give masses of color when in bloom.  Intersperse the other low-growing wildflowers between the primrose patches or plant later-blooming species among the primoses.

 

More Invasive Plants Questions

Japanese Wineberry in Maryland
July 16, 2014 - Hello, we were at Cunningham Falls in Maryland and I can not identify this plant. If you could I would greatly appreciate it, thank you. It looks like a raspberry but the berries are inside small leav...
view the full question and answer

Non-native eleagnus from Jesup GA
January 17, 2014 - An elderly farmer has told me about a plant called Alley Agnes, but I can't find any plant by this name anywhere. He doesn't know another name for it, says it's what everyone has always called it i...
view the full question and answer

Methods of controlling poison ivy
April 19, 2005 - What do you suggest for controlling poison oak (ivy)?
view the full question and answer

Nativity of various bulbs
October 15, 2014 - Are the following bulbs native? Chionodoxa forbesii Camassia leichflinii Crocus Sprint tommasinianus Barr's Purple Hyacinthoides hispanica Narcissus 'Actea' Scilla siberica 'Spring Beauty' ...
view the full question and answer

Control of Acacia escaping cultivation in California
March 26, 2007 - My backyard has been overrun by acacia shrubs. How and what can I do to permanently rid the area of this weed? I hold an agricultural QAL so I have access to herbicides if there are effective ones a...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.