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Friday - October 30, 2015

From: Salado, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Groundcovers, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Straggler Daisy as a Groundcover in Salado, TX
Answered by: Mike Tomme

QUESTION:

I've identified Straggler Daisy or Horseherb as the plant to cover my 20 x 40 partly shady partly sunny lot. Could you provide me with the best method for starting and growing the plant to ensure it would continue to grow until it covers the lot. Thanks in advance.

ANSWER:

Calyptocarpus vialis (Straggler daisy) is one of Mr. Smarty Plants favorite groundcovers and I'm glad you share that opinion. I have a neighbor who does not. His approach is to try to chop it out, kill it with herbicides and cuss at it till it wilts from embaraasement. The result is that he has a beautiful stand of straggler daisy in his yard. So, it would seem, that's one way to do it.

If you favor a kinder and gentler approach, I recommend following the advice in this how-to article on how to grow a buffalograss lawn. Particularly pay attention to the advice on ground preparation because, any time you are trying to establish a monoculture, you are going to have to fight invading weeds until your straggler daisy gets well established.

Also, it will probably require supplemental water best growth, particularly while it is getting established. I would avoid any fertilizer application.

You don't say whether you intend to seed the area, put out transplants or just let what's already there spread, but here is a previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer about growing straggler daisy from seed that you might find helpful.

 

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