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Saturday - October 03, 2015

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Propagation
Title: Dividing Agapanthus
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

When and how do I separate Agapanthus? Should I do it?

ANSWER:

Agapanthus are easy to propagate by division. Kathy Huber of the Houston Chronicle has answered a question about dividing the non-native Agapanthus on their website and has this to say:

Many find agapanthus blooms best when slightly crowded in a bed or slightly pot-bound, but often they do benefit when divided every four years or so. Dig the clumps in spring or fall: Carefully separate divisions with roots, cut the foliage back by half and replant.

Agapanthus tolerates full sun but adapts well in areas with winter sun and filtered summer sun or with morning sun and afternoon shade. These tuberous perennials thrive in a sandy soil enriched with humus.

Good drainage is important. Water well during the spring growing season, especially while the plants are developing flower scapes. Water moderately in fall and winter. Fertilize in early spring. After blooming, water well and fertilize with bone meal or superphosphate.

 

 

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