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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Wednesday - September 02, 2015

From: Round Rock, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders, Watering, Shrubs
Title: Need help with Wheeler's Dwarf Pittosporum
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

We have about five Dwarf Wheeler Pittosporum plants. All of them are mature and were doing well. I was on vacation for a week or so and when I came back I saw of each of them is plant 90% dead. The dead leaves are crunchy and the corresponding stems are dried too. Sprinkler system was on auto run schedule during my absence. I do not see any type of infestation except very mild mealy bug dead infestation. Could you please help me.

ANSWER:

The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.

Wheeler’s Dwarf Pittosporum is a cultivar of Pittosporum tobira which is a native of Japan, and that places it outside our purview here at the Wildflower Center.

Mr. Smarty Plants did find links to three sources that may be of help to you.

homeguides.sfgate.com

Clemson University extension 

University of Florida Extension

 

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